Move files to the trash with a Swift script

Swift 3

I really don’t like using the ‘rm’ shell command – one misplaced character and you can do some serious damage. But when working in the Finder I don’t think twice about deleting files, because I know I can always get them back from the trash. So here is a Swift shell script which does exactly that – it moves files to the trash instead of deleting them permanently.

The syntax is very simple – all parameters refer to file system items which should be moved to the trash:

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SwiftShell 2.0 Readme

I finally got around to updating the SwiftShell 2.0 readme with some actual usage instructions:


SwiftShell

An OS X Framework for command line scripting in Swift.

Usage

Put this at the beginning of each script file:

Run commands

Print output

Runs a shell command just like you would in the terminal. If the command returns with a non-zero exit code it will throw a ShellError.

The name may seem a bit cumbersome, but it explains exactly what it does. SwiftShell never prints anything without explicitly being told to.

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How to use Swift for shell scripting

To be honest I’m not very good at shell scripting. It’s very useful for automation so I would like to be, but I just don’t like the syntax. For instance, this is how you check if a variable is greater than 100:

And here’s how to check if the file referred to in the first argument is readable and not empty:

Enough said.

So I would much rather use Swift, as the syntax is nice, very nice indeed. But the things that bash shell scripts actually are good at, like running shell commands and accessing the shell environment, are not that straightforward in Swift. Here’s how you can perform the various tasks using only the Swift Standard Library and Foundation:

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Redesigning an API – Swift 2.0 style

SwiftShell (an OS X framework for shell scripting in Swift) is currently using the |> operator to combine shell commands, streams and functions, and |>> to print the results:

But Swift 2.0 is here, and it’s clear the way forward is protocols, method chaining and error handling. And being more explicit about what is going on. So for SwiftShell 2 I’m planning something like this:

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